Paul Gervais: Faces and Forms

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detail of Gervais abstract forms

Paul Gervais, Eight Figures, One Red, (detail), 2020, Oil on linen over board, in artist’s frame, 12 x 15 in. Courtesy of the artist

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Paul Gervais’s exhibition consisted of two different but related bodies of work; intimate portraits of people he knows personally, and paintings of objects that are wholly imagined. 

Gervais is relatively new to portraiture. He was inspired by the exhibition "Lucian Freud: The Self-Portraits," at London’s Royal Academy of Arts.  He was particularly moved by how Freud’s work captures the intimate relationships he developed throughout his lifetime and was inspired to take a similar approach to his own life and art. Gervais’s first portrait, made in March of 2020, is a likeness of Gil Cohen, his partner of 46 years, who he continues to paint. His practice has since expanded to include self-portraits, and portraits of friends and relatives, all created from photographs that Gervais shot. The intimate scale of these works forces the viewer to lean in in order to see the paintings’ fine details and to get an idea of the sitter’s personality.   

Although the “forms” referred to in the title of exhibition are imaginary, they reflect Gervais’s sensibility and experience and are closely linked to his portraits. These abstracted forms suggest objects that could be found in any time period or culture. They can sometimes be found embedded in invented minimalist interiors, and others suggest iconic abstract art. Others have personal relevance. For example, Sculpture and a Pool is an oblique homage to David Hockney who Gervais met when studying at the San Francisco Art Institute.

Whether real or imagined, all the paintings in this exhibition are an intimate reflection of Gervais’s life and perceptions.

Kathleen Goncharov
Senior Curator
 


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Installation Images

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Photo By

Jacek Gancarz

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Photo By

Jacek Gancarz

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Photo By

Jacek Gancarz

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Photo By

Jacek Gancarz

Remote video URL

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Recent News

Mar 08, 2021 - In the News
Lucian Freud was probably the most accomplished, certainly the best known, portraitist of his time…
Mar 05, 2021 - In the News
There's a certain tenderness to Paul Gervais's portraits, something that doesn't surprise us when…
Feb 25, 2021 - In the News
The Museum premiere of these new paintings by Paul Gervais features portraits with a tenderness…
Feb 16, 2021 - Press Release
Paul Gervais: Faces and Forms: On View through May 30 at the Boca Raton Museum of Art  The Museum…

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